An Educator’s Reflection on “The Abolition of Man” by C.S. Lewis

It has already taken several readings to grasp a basic understanding of the brilliance contained within this little book (it is less than 100 pages). However, I think it well worth the time spent to understand the ideas it proposes and will probably continue to dig for what I think is the hidden solution to a balanced educational approach that can develop the individuals sense of morality without forcing them to embrace the academic anorexia that plagues the contemporary college and high school campus experience.

Foundations of Democratic Reform

The appeal by Lewis to a transcendent universal standard creates the space required for a democratic approach to education reform. If the standard is universal, every person has some idea of what it might look like and can participate in the process of building a new system. On the other hand, if the standard is arbitrary, then only those with power, authority, and credentials have the ability to propose changes for reasons only they can understand.

How A Value for Education Vanished from Modern Schools

broken sculpture

In an attempt not to teach any values, the value of facts also disappears leaving students with no incentive to learn - except perhaps the fear of bad grades. It seems like we must either embrace some standard of value (or angle of truth) in order to make the learning experience have any significance for the student.

Education for Empowerment of Individuals and Communities

Communities of Empowerment – Chapter & Article Review Kevin Jenson Colorado State University Approaching the concept of empowerment from a western perspective, there are three major views that dominate the discussion. Functional empowerment is the focus of most university and adult training programs. It involves an improvement of skills and performance in one’s roles. Psychological … Continue reading Education for Empowerment of Individuals and Communities

On the Nature of Observation

If I am new to writing, it will be difficult for me to make a value statement about the quality of one author or another. On the other hand, I will quickly be able to discern my feelings toward that author. Perhaps the function of human-centered learning is not to dismiss either sort of observation, but rather to help the individual recognize where each one is valuable in the process of education.

A Review of “The Courage to Teach” by Parker J. Palmer

Welcoming the Person Back to the Process of Education   When I first opened the book “The Courage to Teach” by Parker Palmer, I had no idea that the ideas it contained would connect with me so strongly. To begin with, I have never had a problem with facing a classroom - in part because I have … Continue reading A Review of “The Courage to Teach” by Parker J. Palmer

John Dewey – Experience & Education

Everyone is learning, all the time. Whether or not this learning leads to positive results depends upon internal as well as external factors that vary for every student. John Dewey’s book Experience & Education liberated my idea of education from its confined location in a school classroom and brought the importance of learning into every area of life.

The Abolition of Man – Part 1

Some of you might have read Parker Palmer's "The Courage To Teach" throughout your coursework. I did a review of that book in one of my classes and it raised a question about the difference between telling students the answer and having them discover it. Some teachers believe it is their responsibility to inform students … Continue reading The Abolition of Man – Part 1